About this blog

The UP! Your Service blog is an open community for committed service leaders, managers and frontline providers. We are dedicated to creating a world where people are educated and inspired to excel in service to others.

We are passionately committed to:

  • Upgrading service performance
  • Building Uplifting Service Cultures
  • Uplifting the spirit of service providers worldwide

We welcome your views and participation.
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A Managers Guide to Exploring Service Culture Change

by Jeff Eilertsen, VP Client Success
  Posted on 10 July 2014

When staff members struggle to adopt a new way of thinking, system, or tool, the problem is usually not the approach, system or tool itself. Often, it is the underlying need for cultural change that creates reluctance. I once managed the implementation of a new CRM system in a large organization. The software and tools worked fine. It was the change required in peoples’ process, relationships, and habits that challenged the success of this project.

Launch from the Top Down and from the Bottom Up

by Ron Kaufman, Chairman, UP! Your Service
  Posted on 08 June 2014

When you build an uplifting service culture in a large organization, senior leaders must initiate the process. But ultimately all levels of leadership must embrace the project from the executives in the board room to supervisors on the shop floor.
This is why UP! Your Service recommends a simultaneous “top down” and “bottom up” approach to

Nintendo, It’s Time to Listen to Your Customers

by Surbhi Dedhia, Marketing Director
  Posted on 02 March 2014

Nintendo is one of the names in computer gaming. Whilst companies like Sega, Atari, Philips, etc. have entered and exited the console market with varying degrees of success across the last 20 years; Nintendo has held its own against all comers.

But their latest consoles aren’t having the same impact. The Wii U has lost ground to Sony and Microsoft as limited hardware fails to appeal to hardcore gamers and while grandparents were keen to get involved the first time round; it turns out they aren’t becoming addicted to the endless upgrade cycle like traditional gamers.

“The Seven Rules of Service Leadership” – Live Workshop Keynote

by Ron Kaufman, Chairman, UP! Your Service
  Posted on 04 February 2014

In my experience working with leaders of many of the world’s outstanding service organizations, I have discovered seven essential rules these leaders always follow. Some leverage the power of one rule more than another, and you may do the same. But each of these rules is essential to lead your team to success.

In this video, captured live in a Service Leadership Workshop held in Abu Dhabi in the UAE, Ron Kaufman shares examples, ideas, and suggestions for putting these rules to work – where you work.

Leading from All Levels in Your Organization

by Ron Kaufman, Chairman, UP! Your Service
  Posted on 29 April 2013

If your company is going to pursue building an uplifting service culture, leadership must initiate and support the process. But service leadership must be extended and ultimately embraced at all levels of the organization. Let’s take a closer look at how to lead from all levels.

Five Types of Leaders in a Customer Centricity Initiative

by Richard Whiteley (Advisor)
  Posted on 06 February 2012

In my last blog post, I described the six most common reasons why customer centricity initiatives often fail. One of these is the lack of commitment demonstrated by senior leaders in the organization.

Here at five types of leaders you see most often, and their level of involvement:

Why is Leadership Support so Elusive?

by Jeff Eilertsen, VP Client Success
  Posted on 24 January 2012

I have been in the field of training, leadership, and organizational development for over 20 years. Through all these years, I have heard a one message (and complaint) from practitioners, consultants, authors and gurus: for cultural change to succeed, top leadership must support it. It’s amazing. This message is so consistent. And there is so much evidence to prove it!

Yet the issue persists as a key barrier to successful culture change.

Three Leadership Characteristics for Personal and Cultural Change

by Pat Smith (Chief Executive Officer)
  Posted on 02 June 2011

At UP! Your Service, we work with clients around the world who want to create positive cultural change by building an Uplifting Service Culture. While these clients vary from global, multi-national organizations to government agencies, our experience shows that leadership is always a vital predictor of success.

We note three characteristics of successful personal change that also apply to leading cultural change in a large organization.

Why Leadership is Critical to Building an Uplifting Service Culture

by Ron Kaufman, Chairman, UP! Your Service
  Posted on 22 December 2010

Many CEOs and senior leaders have risen to the top as experts in their industries or as specialists in technical competencies – not as experts in building a strong and sustaining service culture. This often results in initiatives to improve service being considered a frontline or a human resources issue. This is a fundamental mistake.

Building a service culture needs great service leaders and leadership teams. The power of senior leadership to set the vision, focus the entire organization, reward success and remove roadblocks, and role model correct behavior cannot be delegated to others.

Leaders and leadership teams must embrace four key roles to ensure a service culture building effort does not fail.

Four Capacities a Leader Needs to Build a Service Culture

by Charles Tang (Communications Director)
  Posted on 17 November 2010

An excellent blog post from Tony Schwartz on Harvard Business Review encouraged us to write about successful leaders in organizations that are building a service culture.

Leaders must inspire action. Building a service culture is a strategic, long-term initiative that requires sustained focus and commitment. We apply Tony’s list of four “great capacities” of leadership to describe the actions service leaders must take to achieve great results.